Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti

Serengeti, Tanzania

Changi Airport Terminal 1

This adventure is: #adrenaline pumping, #far far away, #scenic

Serengeti: Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - S...

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“Hi, it's u­­­s, Georg­i­n­a, Bri­tt­a, and ­Lee­ Lin­g­”

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Highlights

If you have missed the Wildebeest migration in Masai Mara Kenya, the Wildebeest will travel back to Serengeti by Oct.  You may not see the gruesome Mara River crossing but in Jan to Mar we can see the thousands of Wildebeest gathering in the crater to give birth and also sadly the predators preying on the young calves.  Most of this actions should happen in Ngorongoro Crater.   Imagine Ngorongoro crater where hyper-condensed action happens, bringing all the best in safari to play. Here everything bubbles closer, tighter, and louder. Peer inside this caldera and what you see is a petri dish density of wildlife, more predator-prey interactions per capita than almost anywhere on the planet.  Join me in this spectacular wildlife show in Tanzania.

- Visit Serengeti, one of the oldest ecosystem on earth
- Visit Ngorongoro Crater, often called Africa’s Garden of Eden, the crater is home to over 30,000 animals, a UNESCO site
- See the tree-climbing lions, the only kind of their species in the world that make mahogany trees their home during raining season
- See the largest concentration of baboons in in Lake Manyara
- Witness one of the Seven Natural Wonder of Africa, the Serengeti migration is the longest and largest over land migration in the world
- See the baobab trees in Tarangire National Park, which can store up to 120,000 litres in their tree trunks
- See 400 species of birds, with Pelicans and Pink Flamingos perpetually migrating

We will start our safari journey to Lake Manyara National Park.

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaPelicans and Zebras, Lake Manyara National Park, photo by Christoph Strässler licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0  

Manyara provides the perfect introduction to Tanzania’s birdlife. More than 400 species have been recorded, And even a first-time visitor to Africa might reasonably expect to observe 100 of these in one day. We possibly can see thousands of pink flamingos on their perpetual migration, as well as other large water birds such as pelicans, cormorants and storks.  We will camp overnight in Manyara, then head for Serengeti the next day, spending 3 days exploring Serengeti.

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaPack of lions resting in Mahagony trees, photo by Prof CHen Hualin licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0  

The Serengeti National Park is one of the largest wildlife sanctuaries in the world and of Tanzania. The origin of its name comes from the word “Siringet” in Maasai language which means “never ending plain”.  It is famous for its annual migration of over 1.5 million white-bearded wildebeest and 250,000 zebra and for its numerous Nile crocodile and honey badger.  Herds of buffalo, smaller groups of elephant and giraffe, and many other hooved animals such as eland, topi, kongoni, impala and Grant's gazelle are residents all year round. All three big cats are easily seen, lions are everywhere, cheetah are very common on the southeastern plains, while leopard can typically be found lazing in one of the big trees along the Seronera River.

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaLions sleeping on the trees, a behaviour found only in this part of the world.  Photo by Tommy Veit licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

It is uncertain why do the lions climb trees, it is believe that lions choose to climb trees to get a better view, while others believe it is so that they can catch a bit of a cool breeze on a hot day or get away from flies and other nasties that may bite them at ground level, or even just for fun!  We hope we can catch a glimpse of this rare behaviour.

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaWildebeest migrating in Tanzania, photo by George licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaHerds of elephants seen in Serengeti, photo by Christine Olson  licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0  

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaSerengeti Sunset, photo by Anita Ritenour licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0  

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaZebras in Serengeti, photo by Ian Cochrane licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaMasai Tribesmen walking in Lake Manyara, photo by Ben & Gab licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaElephant foraging in Serengeti, photo by Colin J. McMechan  licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaGiraffes seen during sunset, photo by Dolapo Falola licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaCheetahs seen in Serengeti, photo by Jorge Cancela licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

After spending 2.5 days in Serengeti, we will move to Ngorongoro crater.  The crater was formed three million years ago, a massive supervolcano in what we now call Northern Tanzania exploded.  The mountains were higher and mightier than nearby Mount Kilimanjaro. Its slopes were so vast they directed their own weather patterns and water flow. All was well until one day the mountain exploded and it fell down.

The volcano erupted with a blast that it caved in on itself, that created a caldera spanning a hundred square kilometres, 20 km wide and 600m deep. What was once a glory is gone but the glory returned. Over the course of a few million years pockets of fresh water was formed, then lush vegetation developed, and then the wildlife arrived too.

Abundant water and grasses attracted ungulates, large predators, and countless bird species. Because of its enclosed topography, animals would descend into this bowl-shaped place and never leave. This was where the party happens.

We will camp overnight at the caldera rim and admire the crater from the rim.  The next day we will descend the Ngorongoro crater known as the 8th wonder of the world and get up close with the animals.
Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaNgorongoro crater from the inside, photo by Sajjad Sherally Fazel licensed under CC BY 3.0 

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaZebras with Flamingos in Ngorongoro Crater, photo by Stig Nygaard licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0  

Let's Explore the World's Oldest Ecosystem - Serengeti starting at Serengeti, TanzaniaMaasai boma in Ngorongoro Conservation Area, photo by George Lamson licensed under CC BY 3.0  

We will head to Tarangire National Park, third largest national park in Tanzania, famous for its unusual large elephant population, elephants migration and birding.  The Tarangire Ecosystem is part of the long-distance migration of wildebeest and zebras.  We will camp overnight in Tarangire National Park.  We will end our trip the next day and leave for Nairobi Airport.

Itinerary

Day 1 Fly from Singapore to Nairobi
Day 2 Reach Nairobi and leave for Arusha, overnight at Arusha
Day 3 Visit Lake Manyara, camp overnight at Lake Manyara
Day 4 Explore Serengeti infinity plains, camp overnight at Serengeti
Day 5 Explore Ngorongoro conservation area, camp overnight at Serengeti
Day 6 Explore Ngorongoro crater, camp overnight at Ngorongoro rim
Day 7 Visit Tarangire game drive, camp overnight at Tarangire
Day 8 Leave for Nairobi Airport
Day 9 Arrive in Singapore

Reviews

  • I had a amazing trip with a group of friendly and warm tour mates. Carly was such an assuring tour leader. Excellent and safe Vietnamese driver, Jerry. well spoken English Vietnamese guide Tommy. I enjoyed myself very much and look forward for another trip!

  • Excellent short trip with beautiful verdant countryside and charming local tribal people not corrupted by tourism yet . Be prepared for long drive on narrow winding mountain roads.

  • Best trip ever ! Everyone laughed and enjoyed the hols as if we have known each other all our lives instead of meeting for the first time ! Everyone kept their cool when faced with an unforseen delay . The scenery at Ha Giang is simply superb . There are so many small towns within the mountains with... Read more Best trip ever ! Everyone laughed and enjoyed the hols as if we have known each other all our lives instead of meeting for the first time ! Everyone kept their cool when faced with an unforseen delay . The scenery at Ha Giang is simply superb . There are so many small towns within the mountains with so many minority races living together . Their costumes are so colourful and the ladies' headgears are so lovely to gawk at . If I could , I would love to go again . Highly recommended for gungho people with "throw everything to the wind" attitude . Fantastic local guide and driver (Tom & Jerry) and pats on the back for Carly (Singapore guide) too . Thanks .........rosse and raymond . Read less

  • Georgina was great in: 1) giving reminders so that people can un-RSVP for others on wait list to get a spot. 2) giving clear instructions, photos, links on how to get to the meeting point, 3)explaining why everyone had to be on time and what the program is expected to be and when it might end. ... Read more Georgina was great in: 1) giving reminders so that people can un-RSVP for others on wait list to get a spot. 2) giving clear instructions, photos, links on how to get to the meeting point, 3)explaining why everyone had to be on time and what the program is expected to be and when it might end. Late evening slot was a good idea as we got to see the night installations at The PathFinder portion, but food stalls already closed upon exit. There are toilets inside the exhibit in Fort Canning Center itself. Cleaner than the mobile toilets outside. Thank you for helping to get us tickets when it is so difficult to do so. Read less

  • My wife, son and I never regret of signing up this trip. My 8 year old son enjoyed the walk on the rocky beach. Best moment of the walk was that we came closed to the corals, crabs ???? and ???? shrimps. Thank you threeplaygrounds!